Some Days I Think I Know Things: The Cassandra Poems

Some Days I Think I Know Things: The Cassandra Poems

A contemporary retelling of the story of Cassandra, Some Days I Think I Know Things explores what “truth” really means and asks what Homer’s iconic young prophetess might have to say to anyone wise enough to pay heed to her in the twenty-first century.

Cassandra walks among us once more and, just prior to the sacking of a Troy not unlike any modern city, she sheds light on the idyllic domestic life that she shares with her father Priam, mother Hecuba, and the rest of her doomed, if royal, family. No sooner has she relished in the timeless sexual awakening dreamt about by most girls, than she must stoically submit to the indignities of the invading Greeks. In the final section of the book, Cassandra pronounces a series of prescient “Lost Prophesies” intended for our time.

From Signature Editions:

However much her Cassandra remains faithful to the figure of the ancients, Douglas destabilizes her heroine’s primacy as “truth-teller” with a witty, varied chorus whose voices we can’t fail to recognize from the quotidian of our present-day lives. Questions about how to construct personal narrative, the imminence of environmental apocalypse, and the power of young girls make Rhonda Douglas’s first book of poetry a fresh and unforgettable look at what causes the present to tick so inevitably from times immemorial.

Recommendations

“I like this book. The poems flow well together, and you get a good sense of the voices of both the characters and the narrator. The first piece in the collection, “Imagining Cassandra”, ends with the words “I’m just saying you might // want to think about it // before you open the door”.

All warnings aside, I encourage you to let this story in.”

Voices of Venus, 12 July 2011

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If you ask your local library, they can also order the book in for you. Authors receive a royalty for books stocked by libraries through the Public Lending Right Program of the Canada Council for the Arts.